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A student and Lynne Parker, associate vice chancellor and director of the new AI Tennessee Initiative at UT, discuss how an AI robot works inside a lab in the Min H. Kao Electrical Engineering and Computer Science building
Lynne Parker, associate vice chancellor and director of the new AI Tennessee Initiative at UT, talks with a student about how an AI robot works inside a lab in UT’s Min H. Kao Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Building.

From steam power and electricity to computers and the internet, technological advancements have always disrupted labor markets, pushing out some jobs while creating others. Artificial intelligence remains something of a misnomer – the smartest computer systems still don’t actually know anything – but the technology has reached an inflection point where it’s poised to affect new classes of jobs: artists and knowledge workers.

Specifically, the emergence of large language models – AI systems that are trained on vast amounts of text – means computers can now produce human-sounding written language and convert descriptive phrases into realistic images. The Conversation asked five artificial intelligence researchers, including Lynne Parker, associate vice chancellor and director of the AI Tennessee Initiative at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, to discuss how large language models are likely to affect artists and knowledge workers. And, as our experts noted, the technology is far from perfect, which raises a host of issues – from misinformation to plagiarism – that affect human workers. Read the full article on The Conversation. This article was translated into Spanish.

UT is a member of The Conversation, an independent source for news articles and informed analysis written by the academic community and edited by journalists for the general public. Through our partnership, we seek to provide a better understanding of the important work of our faculty.

CONTACT:

Lindsey Owen (865-974-6375, lowen8@utk.edu)