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David Mandrus
Jerry and Kay Henry Endowed Professor of Materials Science and Engineering David Mandrus stands in his laboratory. Photo by Jennie Andrews.

Peer acknowledgment is often regarded as one of the best forms of recognition for researchers in any given field.

Two UT faculty members have earned the distinction of being among the most cited researchers in the world, according to Clarivate Analytics, formerly Thompson Reuters.

Jerry and Kay Henry Endowed Professor of Materials Science and Engineering David Mandrus and Gore Hunger Professor of Environmental Science in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Daniel Simberloff have each been recently recognized for their contributions to science.

“This is a tremendous honor,” said Mandrus. “Having other scientists acknowledge our contributions is a validation of the research we’ve been conducting.”

Simberloff added, “I came to UT 21 years ago because of its long history and strength in conservation. The fact that my research continues to be cited shows how important ecology and biology are to the world today.”

It’s the second such recognition for Mandrus since 2014 and the second in a row for Simberloff, placing them in select company among researchers.

Clarivate Analytics studied research and releases, measuring the total number of times that others cited the material in their own findings.

A picture of Daniel Simberloff
Gore Hunger Professor of Environmental Science in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Daniel Simberloff

Those measurements came in relation to specific findings and papers rather than a cross-examination of all work tied to a researcher, placing the two UT faculty members in the top 1 percent of all research scientists across the world.

Simberloff’s work centers around the study of invasive species, coexistence of species, and how species can differ depending on other organisms in their environment. Collectively, his research has been cited more than 60,000 times.

Mandrus’s research involves discovering new materials related to electronics and magnetics, such as superconductors and thermoelectrics.

A Fellow of the American Physical Society, Mandrus has seen his research cited more than 6,000 times.

C O N T A C T :

David Goddard (865-974-0683, david.goddard@utk.edu)