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Chinese lion dance costume at Gardens by the Bay, Singapore. The display is part of an exhibition to welcome the lunar new year in 2021.

On Jan. 22, more than a billion people globally will welcome the Year of the Rabbit – or the Year of the Cat, depending on which cultural traditions they follow – as the start of the lunar new year.

Megan Bryson
Bryson

A scholar of East Asian religions at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Associate Professor of Religious Studies Megan Bryson is familiar with the wide range of lunar and lunisolar calendars used in different religions and cultures, and especially with the religious significance of the East Asian lunisolar calendar. Read the full article on The Conversation.

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CONTACT:

Lindsey Owen (865-974-6375, lowen8@utk.edu)