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UT Knoxville will not increase tuition for the upcoming academic year, marking the first time since 1984 that tuition has held steady on the campus.

The UT Board of Trustees approved a $1.2 billion budget for the 2018–19 fiscal year Friday. This is the fourth straight year the university has held tuition increases at or below 3 percent. This is good news for our incoming freshmen, who will comprise our largest class in history and one of the most accomplished.

“It is our mission to provide not only the highest quality education here at UT Knoxville, but an affordable one that offers opportunity to students across Tennessee and beyond,” said UT Knoxville Interim Chancellor Wayne T. Davis. “A zero-percent tuition increase shows how seriously we take that commitment.

“It also speaks to the commitment from the state to invest in its public universities. I want to thank the governor for his strong leadership over the past eight years and his support for education in Tennessee. During his time in office, we’ve seen tremendous investment in our strategic priorities, infrastructure, and salaries for faculty and staff.”

The board approved an increase to the Student Program and Services Fee (SPSF) by $36 per student. The fee is used for to support student services, activities, programs and facilities organized or operated under the direction of the Division of Student Life. Additional fee increases apply only to specific graduate programs to cover increased operating costs.

UT’s 2018–19 budget includes $5.8 million in capital maintenance for roof replacements and an additional $12.5 million in recurring state appropriations. Of that, $5.5 million will go toward a 2.5 percent salary pool, the total cost of which is $7.25 million.

The pool will be used for merit and market raises. Any employee earning $40,000 and below will receive a minimum of $600 and be eligible for a merit increase based on performance.

The Board of Trustees also took the following actions:

  • Named the Herbert College of Agriculture to honor Jim and Judi Herbert, whose transformational gift to the college will provide resources to help establish it as one of the top institutions of its kind in the country. Read more about the college naming.
  • Named the Integrated Business and Engineering Program (IBEP) in honor of Ralph Heath, who earned his bachelor’s in electrical engineering from the Tickle College of Engineering and his MBA in aerospace and defense from the Haslam College of Business. The program brings together students from business and engineering to expose them to concepts and ideas from the other perspective. Read more about the program and its naming.
  • Approved a student fee for the new supply chain management master’s degree program, which will be offered beginning in fall 2019. Supply chain is one of the university’s most acclaimed disciplines, and the new program will be the Haslam College of Business’ first master’s degree program to be offered fully online.

Media coverage:

News Sentinel, Erica Breunlin, June 8; Associated Press, June 11. AP story ran in 12 outlets including WVLT, MyFox Memphis, WRCB, the Nashville Ledger, WSMV Nashville.

CONTACT:

Tyra Haag (865-974-5460, tyra.haag@tennessee.edu)

Megan Boehnke (865-974-3242, mboehnke@utk.edu)